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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



Testing the Ability to Decrease Chemotherapy in Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Who Have No Remaining Cancer at Surgery after Limited Pre-operative Chemotherapy and HER2-Targeted Therapy

Breast

This trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab work in eliminating further chemotherapy after surgery in patients with HER2-positive stage II-IIIa breast cancer who have no cancer remaining at surgery (either in the breast or underarm lymph nodes) after pre-operative chemotherapy and HER2-targeted therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may enable fewer chemotherapy drugs to be given without compromising patient outcomes compared to the usual treatment.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT04266249
ECOGBREEA1181

Circulating Tumor DNA Testing in Predicting Treatment for Patients with Stage IIA Colon Cancer After Surgery, COBRA Trial

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase II / III trial studies how well circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) testing in the blood works to identify patients with stage IIA colon cancer who might benefit from additional treatment with chemotherapy after surgery. ctDNA are small pieces of genetic materials (DNA) that are shed by tumors into the blood. Finding ctDNA in the blood means that there are very likely small amounts of cancer remaining after surgery that may not be detectable using other tests, such as medical imaging. Testing for ctDNA levels may help identify patients with colon cancer who benefit from receiving chemotherapy after surgery. It is not yet known whether giving additional treatment with chemotherapy after surgery to patients who test positive for ctDNA and are at low risk for cancer recurrence would extend their time without disease compared to the usual approach (active surveillance).
Colon, Rectal
II/III
Agarwal, Rajiv
NCT04068103
NRGGI005

A Study to Compare the Administration of Pembrolizumab after Surgery Versus Administration both before and after Surgery for High-Risk Melanoma

Melanoma

This phase II trial studies how pembrolizumab works before and after surgery in treating patients with stage III-IV high-risk melanoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.. Giving pembrolizumab before and after surgery may work better compared to after surgery alone in treating melanoma.
Melanoma
II
Davis, Elizabeth
NCT03698019
ECOGMELS1801

Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase IV trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system embryonal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
IV
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT02875314
VICCPED1751

Basket Study of Neratinib in Participants With Solid Tumors Harboring Somatic HER2 or EGFR Exon 18 Mutations

Multiple Cancer Types

This is an open-label, multicenter, multinational, Phase 2 basket study exploring the efficacy and safety of neratinib as monotherapy or in combination with other therapies in participants with HER (EGFR, HER2) mutation-positive solid tumors.
Bladder, Colon, Esophageal, Gastric/Gastroesophageal, Neuro-Oncology, Ovarian, Urologic, Uterine
II
Mayer, Ingrid
NCT01953926
VICCMD1403

Long-term Safety and Efficacy Extension Study for Participants With Advanced Tumors Who Are Currently on Treatment or in Follow-up in a Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Study (MK-3475-587 / KEYNOTE-587)

Miscellaneous

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in participants from previous Merck pembrolizumab-based parent studies who roll-over into this extension study. This study will consist of three phases: 1) First Course Phase, 2) Survival Follow-up Phase or 3) Second Course Phase. Each participant will roll-over to this extension study in one of the following three phases, depending on the study phase they were in at the completion of the parent study. Participants who were in the First Course Phase of study treatment in their parent study will enter the First Course Phase of this study and complete up to 35 doses or more every 3 weeks (Q3W) or 17 doses or more every 6 weeks (Q6W) of study treatment with pembrolizumab or a pembrolizumab-based combination according to arm assignment. Participants who were in the Follow-up Phase in the parent study (post-treatment or Survival Follow-up Phase) will enter the Survival Follow-up Phase of this study. Participants who were in the Second Course Phase in their parent study will enter Second Course Phase of this study and complete up to 17 doses Q3W or 8 doses Q6W of study treatment with pembrolizumab or a pembrolizumab-based combination according to arm assignment. Any participant originating from a parent trial where crossover to pembrolizumab was permitted upon disease progression may be may be eligible for 35 doses as Q3W or 17 doses Q6W of pembrolizumab (approximately 2 years), if they progress while on the control arm and pembrolizumab is approved for the indication in the country where the potential eligible crossover participant is being evaluated.
Miscellaneous
III
Ancell, Kristin
NCT03486873
VICCMD1932

Comparing Two Treatment Combinations, Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel with 5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and Liposomal Irinotecan for Older Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread

Pancreatic

This phase II trial compares two treatment combinations: gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel, or fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and liposomal irinotecan in older patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and liposomal irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This study may help doctors find out which treatment combination is better at prolonging life in older patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.
Pancreatic
II
Cardin, Dana
NCT04233866
ECOGGIEA2186

Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
III
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT03007147
COGAALL1631

Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
III
Pastakia, Devang
NCT02176967
COGANBL1232

Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.
Pediatric Leukemia, Pediatrics
III
Zarnegar-Lumley, Sara
NCT03959085
COGAALL1732

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