Skip to main content

Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



A Study of ME-401 in Subjects With CLL / SLL, FL, and B-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Multiple Cancer Types

A Three-Arm Study of ME-401 in Subjects with Relapsed / Refractory CLL / SLL or FL, of ME-401 in Combination with Rituximab in Subjects with Relapsed / Refractory CLL / SLL or B-cell NHL, and of ME-401 in Combination with Zanubrutinib in Subjects with Relapsed / Refractory CLL / SLL or B-cell NHL
Leukemia, Lymphoma
I
Morgan, David
NCT02914938
VICCHEM1714

Trastuzumab, Vinorelbine Tartrate, and Avelumab with or without Utomilumab in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

Breast

This phase II trial studies the how well trastuzumab, vinorelbine tartrate, and avelumab with or without utomilumab work in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vinorelbine tartrate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Utomilumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving trastuzumab, vinorelbine tartrate, and avelumab with or without utomilumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT03414658
VICCBRE1893

Tabelecleucel for Solid Organ or Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Participants With Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease (EBV+ PTLD) After Failure of Rituximab or Rituximab and Chemotherapy

Hematologic

The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit and characterize the safety profile of tabelecleucel for the treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (EBV+ PTLD) in the setting of (1) solid organ transplant (SOT) after failure of rituximab and rituximab plus chemotherapy or (2) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) after failure of rituximab.
Hematologic
III
Dholaria, Bhagirathbhai
NCT03394365
VICCCTT1875

A Study of Encorafenib Plus Cetuximab With or Without Chemotherapy in People With Previously Untreated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Multiple Cancer Types

The purpose of this study is to evaluate two study medicines (encorafenib plus cetuximab) taken alone or together with standard chemotherapy for the potential treatment of colorectal cancer that: - has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic); - has a certain type of abnormal gene called "BRAF"; and - has not received prior treatment. Participants in this study will receive one of the following study treatments: - Encorafenib plus cetuximab: These participants will receive encorafenib by mouth at home every day and cetuximab once every two weeks by intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into the vein) at the study clinic. - Encorafenib plus cetuximab with chemotherapy: These participants will receive encorafenib and cetuximab in the way described in the bullet above. Additionally, they will receive standard chemotherapy by IV infusion and oral treatment at home. - Chemotherapy alone: These participants will receive chemotherapy, the standard treatment for this condition, by IV infusion at the study clinics and oral treatment at home. The study team will monitor how each participant responds to the study treatment for up to about 3 years.
Colon, Rectal
III
Eng, Cathy
NCT04607421
VICCGI2085

Study of Efficacy and Safety of Tisagenlecleucel in HR B-ALL EOC MRD Positive Patients

Multiple Cancer Types

This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase II study to determine the efficacy and safety of tisagenlecleucel in de novo HR pediatric and young adult B-ALL patients who received first-line treatment and are EOC MRD positive. The study will have the following sequential phases: screening, pre-treatment, treatment & follow-up, and survival. After tisagenlecleucel infusion, patient will have assessments performed more frequently in the first month and then at Day 29, then every 3 months for the first year, every 6 months for the second year, then yearly until the end of the study. Efficacy and safety will be assessed at study visits and as clinically indicated throughout the study. The study is expected to end in approximately 8 years after first patient first treatment (FPFT). A post-study long term follow-up for lentiviral vector safety will continue under a separate protocol per health authority guidelines.
Leukemia, Pediatric Leukemia
II
Kitko, Carrie
NCT03876769
VICCPED1945

EA2176: Phase 3 Clinical Trial of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel + / - Nivolumab in Metastatic Anal Cancer Patients

Rectal

This phase 3 trial compares the addition of nivolumab to chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) versus usual treatment (chemotherapy alone) for the treatment of anal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab together with carboplatin and paclitaxel may help doctors find out if the treatment is better or the same as the usual approach.
Rectal
III
Eng, Cathy
NCT04444921
ECOGGIEA2176

Comparing Two Methods to Follow Patients with Pancreatic Cysts

Pancreatic

The purpose of this study is to compare the two approaches for monitoring pancreatic cysts. The study doctors want to compare more frequent monitoring vs less frequent monitoring in order to learn which monitoring method leads to better outcome for patients with pancreatic cysts.
Pancreatic
N/A
Tan, Marcus
NCT04239573
ECOGGIEA2185

A Study of a New Drug, Nirogacestat, for Treating Desmoid Tumors that Cannot be Removed by Surgery

Pediatrics

This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well nirogacestat works in treating patients patients less than 18 years of age with desmoid tumors that has grown after at least one form of treatment by mouth or in the vein that cannot be removed by surgery. Nirogacestat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
Pediatrics
II
Borinstein, Scott
NCT04195399
COGARST1921

A Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness and Safety of CAEL-101 in Patients With Mayo Stage IIIa AL Amyloidosis

Hematologic

AL (or light chain) amyloidosis begins in the bone marrow where abnormal proteins misfold and create free light chains that cannot be broken down. These free light chains bind together to form amyloid fibrils that build up in the extracellular space of organs, affecting the kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, nervous system and digestive tract. The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether CAEL-101, a monoclonal antibody that removes AL amyloid deposits from tissues and organs, improves overall survival and it is safe and well tolerated in patients with stage IIIa AL amyloidosis.
Hematologic
III
Sengsayadeth, Salyka
NCT04512235
VICCPCL2080

Chemoradiotherapy with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Localized Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

Bladder

This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.
Bladder
III
Kirschner, Austin
NCT03775265
SWOGUROS1806

To learn more about any of our clinical
trials, call 1-800-811-8480 or complete
the online Self-Referral Form here: